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PL Season Review 1959-60

1959-60 CTPL Season & Grand Final Review 

 

Standings at the end of the roster were Glenorchy 71, South Hobart 61, New Town 50 and Sandy Bay 43.

 

A repeat of the 58-59 final was the outcome of the semi-final round after Glenorchy (minor premiers for the sixth successive season) defeated Sandy Bay and South Hobart put New Town out of the running.  Glenorchy indulged in a run orgy at the expense of Sandy Bay, with Doug Walton scoring 110* out of his team’s 276/6, after dismissing the Bay for 139.  South passed New Town’s 157/8 with six overs and four wickets in hand.

 

A sparkling 124 by Dal Johnston highlighted the first day of the final; but for this courageous innings, Glenorchy’s innings could have fallen apart.  Fred Tidswell obtained the wicket of Glenorchy’s captain Lloyd Smith without any score on the board in his first over, and had a catch to fine leg been held from Ray Heffernan’s bat in Don Broughton’s opening over, Glenorchy would have been in deep trouble.

 

With the score at 16/2, Johnston joined David McGuire at the wicket and the pair set about restoring Glenorchy’s hopes, but the partnership was broken when McGuire (24) was trapped in front by Tidswell on 34, and then South took the vital wicket of Doug Walton (15) at 55.

 

Mike Hyland and Johnston added 80 valuable runs to take the score to 135 when Hyland (31) was caught and bowled by Doug Wylie.  Stan Lewis then joined Johnston, who attacked the bowling scoring to all points around the wicket until he was bowled by Ross Dufty for 124 in an innings which included sixteen fours and occupied 264 minutes.  Lewis and Johnston’s partnership was worth 107, of which 77 came from Johnston’s bat.

 

The remaining four wickets fell for the addition of 39 runs; Dufty, despite being restricted by a head cold, attacked the wicket with success to finish with 4/59.  In the remaining 28 minutes, South scored 16 without loss.

 

Resuming the following Saturday, Ian Cowley and Alby Drew set about wearing down the bowling – reaching 73 before Drew was bowled by Noel Diprose for 35.  Cowley and Ross Dufty took South to lunch with the score 85/1.

 

Dufty was cautious early in his innings but gradually the pair lifted the tempo; the 100 came up in 185 minutes and the 150 in 262 minutes.  Two runs short of 200, Cowley was bowled by a ball from Diprose which dipped and yorked him; his valuable 87 included five boundaries but occupied 316 minutes.  The pair added 125 and paved the way for South’s victory.

 

With Cowley’s dismissal Dufty took charge and batted magnificently; his cover drives and pulls to leg were copybook.  Together with Ron Linton he took the score to 250 when Linton (22), trying to force the pace, was well caught by Walton at deep mid-on off McGuire.

 

Meanwhile Dufty went on in grand style and with a glance to leg brought up his century in 267 minutes with twelve fours.  Omond was lbw to Diprose at 270 when he attempted to pull a ball hard to leg.  Then with his score on 107 Dufty drove McGuire hard – McGuire leapt high and just failed to hold on as the ball ricocheted to Smith, who also failed to grab the chance.  It was fitting perhaps that Dufty, with a beautifully played off-drive to the boundary, scored the winning run to finish with 125*, including 17 fours.

 

After South passed Glenorchy’s score an appeal against the light was upheld at 5.47pm.

 

South’s success was attributed to solid batting against bowling which lacked penetration. It was Ross Dufty’s match.  Not only had he been South’s best bowler, with 4/57 on the first day, but his undefeated century – his first for South Hobart (and second in TCA, having reached three figures for Clarence v Kingborough) was full of merit.

 

South Hobart’s defeat of Glenorchy for the second year was very much a carbon copy of the previous season’s final, when South had chased down 348 (the highest score of the season to that point) with the loss of five wickets.  This time Glenorchy had set them 282 and South repeated the dose, with six wickets in hand.

 

Mercury reporter – Keith Welsh